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Why Alumni Donate to the School of Law
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We recently emailed alumni donors to ask why they support us. Below you will find excerpts followed by full quotes from the comments of 37 who replied. Click here if you'd like to donate.

Excerpts

"Because of the ongoing commitment to community service, to making the world a better place, and the commitment to racial and cultural diversity." — Shirley Bergert, ‘75

"I give because Justice is not free. Even pro bono is costly." — Jacob Fein-Helfman, ‘75

"… UDC not only trains lawyers to help the disadvantaged, it promotes study and debate on how to improve the delivery of justice in America. It deserves the support of all of us who went to law school (for the now quaint objective) to help improve people’s lives." — Leslie Gerwin, ‘75

"I was there for the first year of the Antioch law School, but left after that and did not finish law school. So, I have been very pleased over the years that the law school continued. I think this kind of legal education is essential, and really applaud the Cahn’s vision of an activist legal education..." — Karin Gjording, ‘75

"Dave Clarke School of Law offers our world hope in many ways… I donate to honor and support such hope." — Myles Glasgow, ‘75

"… I certainly want to sate how much and how unforgettably, Antioch and its wonderful students and teachers meant to me. I was a lucky member of the initial class with the blank paper in front of us to start its history. … I am now 85; time goes quickly but memories remain strong and clear." — Maury Knight, ‘75

"…I give now because I am fully committed to UDC Law's important mission." — Gwynn T. Swinson, ‘76

"I donate because my law school, Antioch School of Law, provided me with a legal education at a time when women were only just beginning to be admitted to law school, and the school provided an atmosphere that supported the inclusion of women in the legal profession." — Patricia Barone, ‘77

"I was a mom in tennis shoes wondering what I would do when my fast-maturing kids became totally independent. Then I entered Antioch and discovered immigration law and the issue of immigrants’ rights, a discovery that led to an approximately 30-year career that has provided me the opportunity to help hundreds of people and great personal satisfaction." — Carolyn Waller, ‘77

"…I just mailed a check for $50 because every small donation adds up, and I want to see a Law School that was formed for social justice continue." — Kitty Tucker, ‘78

"Essentially, I believe in the goals sets by ASL and want to keep the dream alive via UDC Law." — Ricardo Durham, ‘80

"…it appears that UDC has largely continued the Antioch tradition. Anything that I can do to help UDC continue the Antioch tradition is a good thing." — Norman Googel, ‘80

"… I donate to UDC Law because I believe it is the best hope of continuing Antioch’s cutting edge of legal education and training for aspiring lawyers. Academic attainment, with no corresponding social commitment is a luxury our society cannot afford. I want to see the Antioch tradition continued." — Penfield Tate, ‘81

"I donate to the school because I believe in its mission and goals. If it were not for Antioch, I would not be a lawyer, judge or law professor." — Penny L. Willrich, ‘82

"It makes me very happy that Antioch/UDC is so successful at carrying on its mission, been accessible to everyone on so many levels, and has turned out to be a beacon brighter than it was when I applied." — Janet Aspen, ‘83

"…Antioch broke barriers and set the standard for a 21st Century clinical/legal education. UDC Law continues to raise the bar." — Sandra Mattavous Frye, ‘83

"I donate … because consistent and strong alumni giving is important to maintain ABA accreditation and to leverage additional financial support. As a result, the school is on a stronger foundation to enhance growth." — Doreen Hope, ‘84

"Bottom line: I think it’s because I trust you, the school and the mission/work you do." — Richard Preston, ‘84

"I donate because I am truly appreciative of the blessing and opportunity I received at Antioch." — Gilbert West, ‘84

"UDC Clarke School of Law has carried on the tradition of excellence embodied in Antioch School of Law's clinical programs. … I believe most touched by the clinical programs continue to reach out to others and "Pay it Forward". What a great legacy for the alumni to support!" — Anonymous Donor, ‘85

"The clinical program has provided free legal services to low income people in Washington, DC on a scale unmatched by clinical programs at other schools. That uniqueness, that fragile purpose, speaks to the better angels or our nature, deserves our support." — Paul Peloquin, ‘85

"I graduated from the … Antioch School of Law and hope that UDC David A. Clarke School of Law can carry on the same principles and philosophy about social justice and equality." — Manuel Rivera, ‘85

"I donate because of the work that the students do in the clinics." — Karen Newton, ‘86

"It's nice to give back." "Why fight it?" "In life, we give." — Pete Friday, ‘87

"…I have chosen to be a public defender of my own volition and have enjoyed almost three decades in the profession--in great part because of Antioch. … So, I choose to give back to the institution that gave me so much." — Ana Maria Guzman '87

"… the best source of charitable giving for a school … is its alumni. I feel the same way for the law school. I’m hoping that donations to the law school increase over time so that it can excel in everything it does." — Anonymous Antioch Law Alum

"…I was a minority among minorities, to quote one of my classmates. To my surprise, the rest of the class was so diverse that I felt immediately at home -- everyone else was like me! The school opened up a window to a world that I had never known before…" — Linda Sun, ‘92

"I donate because: … this school needs the money more than the other two I graduated from, (and) I want to support law students who have an interest in working for the public interest" — Rudi Schreiber, ‘95

"…Because I love the law school and all that it stands for. It changed my life and put me on a career path that I never would have been on had it not been for the law school." — Anthony Cade, ‘97

"I gave … because I really do appreciate my legal education obtained from DCSL, and I think the professors and staff are simply the best!" — Felicia Couts, Esq. (formerly Tucker) '97

"…I donate out of appreciation and I hope that the law school is always able to provide other students with the opportunities afforded to me and continue in its unique mission." — Sarah C. Bullard, ‘03

"… I really love my school. … it is not the quality of the teaching alone that makes the school stand out in my mind. It the passion and compassion the institution instills in its students -- to do good works and help the people around them…" — Sean Hanover, ‘08

" ‘Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, these ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance’ - RFK The donated money is for hope. The school is the righteous vector." — Mike Bowers, ‘10

"I donate because UDC gave the opportunity to go to law school and stay in law school by giving me scholarships. I want to pay it forward to someone else." — Jose Campos, ‘12

"UDC Law truly opened my eyes and connected my heart to the underprivileged communities that lack the opportunity to receive quality legal representation, which strengthened my inner desire to make a positive contribution to society…" — Aimellia Siemson, ‘12

"Because UDC accepted me for my mission statement and not just my raw LSAT and GPA numbers…" — Byron White, ‘13

Full Quotes

"Because of the ongoing commitment to community service, to making the world a better place, and the commitment to racial and cultural diversity. There are plenty of law schools for people who want to do well financially but a dearth of places for those who want to do good and who want to be surrounded by similarly minded people with the honorable goal of using legal skills for the benefit of vulnerable people. Also Joe, because I love your emails. Really. For many of us from ASL, especially early ASL, we needed to be repeatedly and gently hammered to understand UDC’s intent." — Shirley Bergert, ‘75

"I give because Justice is not free. Even pro bono is costly." — Jacob Fein-Helfman, ‘75

"There may be a glut of law schools and lawyers, but there is a shortage of those willing and knowledgeable about how to assist those most in need of lawyers for seeking justice. Moreover, the legal system is ____(choose your criticism). UDC not only trains lawyers to help the disadvantaged, it promotes study and debate on how to improve the delivery of justice in America. It deserves the support of all of us who went to law school (for the now quaint objective) to help improve people’s lives." — Leslie Gerwin, ‘75

"I was there for the first year of the Antioch law School, but left after that and did not finish law school. So, I have been very pleased over the years that the law school continued. I think this kind of legal education is essential, and really applaud the Cahn’s vision of an activist legal education. So I donated this year because:

1. Joe kept sending informational e-mails so I could keep abreast of what’s going on.
2. The dean’s decision to give students the opportunity to help represent protesters in Baltimore was a real turning point—I cheered when I read it & immediately sent money!
3. Joe’s repeated entreaties to reach certain goals!!!!"
Karin Gjording, ‘75

"Dear Joe, UDC/Dave Clarke School of Law offers our world hope in many ways and that is why I might contribute to its support. Hope for those who want its education. Hope for the clients its students may help. Hope for those who will benefit from the ways the legal work benefits others directly and indirectly. Hope for those who respect the students educated by UDC's curriculum, social connections, history and examples. I donate to honor and support such hope." — Myles Glasgow, ‘75

"I need to do this now and not procrastinate. The door is shutting and I certainly want to state how much and how unforgettably Antioch and its wonderful students and teachers meant to me. I was a lucky member of the initial class with the blank paper in front of us to start its history. What a wonderful group of people.

"When there was a party, everyone was invited. When a teacher asked for an answer from a student, those of us who were petrified of being called upon, gratefully allowed Myles to step forward time and time again. There was O'Toole weaving us in and out of Torts. The bread that Colleen would bake and phone us in time to arrive with a bottle of wine; the treks through the D.C. area with Anne Pilsbury and our evening with her friend who was asked to help us through the morass of Civil Procedure. I recall Jim Drew and my initiation at the D.C. jail and how he left it to Sue to explain to me some of the finer points of cross-dressing. I was not quite the oldest member of the class but almost so but all of you made me feel youthful and hopeful and in the right place at the right time of my life. I thought that John would be ready to relocate to the D.C. area and I would be able to finish with you but that didn't happened and I returned to John, three kids, and Rutgers. I did follow the Antioch path though and I will never forget any of you. I hope the years have been kind and your spirits remain unbroken. Mine is, even though it is sorely troubled. I am now 85; time goes quickly but memories remain strong and clear." — Maury Knight, ‘75

"I give because Antioch prepared me well for a rewarding career in public service and higher education. I am very proud to be an "original" dual degree Antiochian, who graduated from Yellow Springs in 1973 and the Antioch School of Law (ASL) in 1976. While in college, I was a student representative to the committee that studied the feasibility of creating ASL (from the Urban Law Institute) and got to know the Cahns during that process. The late Dean Jean, who became a surrogate Mom, dared me to matriculate anywhere else! She, Edgar, a great faculty and loyal supporters fought indefatigably to secure ASL's full accreditation in an era when clinical legal education was highly controversial in traditional academic circles. Ironically, I served on ASL's Board many years later when the decision was made to terminate its affiliation with my alma mater Antioch College. I give now because I am fully committed to UDC Law's important mission." — Gwynn T. Swinson, ‘76

"I donate because my law school, Antioch School of Law, provided me with a legal education at a time when women were only just beginning to be admitted to law school, and the school provided an atmosphere that supported the inclusion of women in the legal profession. Antioch embodied the best meaning of "affirmative action" by evaluating potential students on a case-by-case basis, looking to see where they came from and what they did with their background. We had students who came from Appalachia, who were Vietnam veterans, one who ran a rape crisis center, and who were from many other varied backgrounds with varied achievements. The opportunity to meet these students from all over the country and from so many different walks of life was very enriching for all the students. The clinical program also allowed me to get over my abject fear of speaking in front of others by "easing" me into the practice of law by handling actual cases with increasing degrees of responsibility from the beginning of my legal education until the conclusion of that education. I got over that fear in large part because of my legal education at Antioch and have spent the last 38 years practicing law (and now it’s hard to shut me up!)." — Patricia Barone, ‘77

"I agree with most of the comments that you have already received and wonder if I can really add anything, but here’s a try: I was a mom in tennis shoes wondering what I would do when my fast- maturing kids became totally independent. Then I entered Antioch and discovered immigration law and the issue of immigrants’ rights, a discovery that led to an approximately 30-year career that has provided me the opportunity to help hundreds of people and great personal satisfaction." — Carolyn Waller, ‘77

"After your many e-mails asking for support, as an Antioch School of Law graduate, I just mailed a check for $50 because every small donation adds up, and I want to see a Law School that was formed for social justice continue." — Kitty Tucker, ‘78

"I donate for several reasons…ASL (and hopefully UDC Law continues in this regard) allowed me to give back to the Washington DC community via the Public Law Institute…Legal representation for the disenfranchised was the specific reason why I attended ASL as opposed to say Howard U…Of course I was also intrigued by the thought that in providing legal services to the typically voiceless in the DC community that I would also be able to obtain a hands on clinical education that might best prepare me for the demands of being a practicing attorney… Essentially, I believe in the goals sets by ASL and want to keep the dream alive via UDC Law…Of course I’m extremely pleased that UDC Law continues to ensure that its student population is diverse such that it is inclusive beyond the traditions expected by most law schools and if my donations can ensure that this diversity continues, then I feel like I’ve assisted in creating an opportunity for a legal education to those who normally would not have such an opportunity." — Ricardo Durham, ‘80

"I have donated a small amount only once but hope to donate more in the future. Although I am not a member of a minority group, I was a classic non-traditional student in the Antioch spirit and an aspiring social activist. Once I discovered Antioch, I knew it was the only place for me. If not for Antioch, I would not be a lawyer today (maybe I would be something more interesting!). In reading the alumni publications, it appears that UDC has largely continued the Antioch tradition. Anything that I can do to help UDC continue the Antioch tradition is a good thing." — Norman Googel, ‘80

"When I first arrived at Antioch in 1978, it was for my interview for admission into the law school. I had never really heard of the school before but only applied and attended the interview at the urging of my father, who at the time was a practicing plaintiff’s civil rights lawyer with his own firm in Colorado. My father was fascinated by a law school that actually taught a student how to be a practitioner and not simply have the theoretical knowledge and understanding of the law. Needless to say, when I arrived at Antioch I was struck by a bug that I haven’t shaken yet.

"Walking into the doors of the Warder Totten building was like entering into an alternative universe. There was an entire organization devoted to training lawyers to be effective advocates for the disenfranchised, ignored, and systemically abused. Antioch was both a law school and a public interest law firm. It had an infectious spirit that permeated through the entire student body, faculty, staff and the administration. After meeting the Cahns it was readily apparent that they were the genesis of that infectious spirit. I saw it embodied on a daily basis in faculty, staff, and clinical fellows like Vivian Canty, Mike Diamond, Larry Weeden, Francis Stephens and Pat Madsen. They taught us not only to be deep thinking lawyers, but strong and aggressive advocates for our clients. The lessons I learned at Antioch – in the classrooms, the courtrooms, and on the streets – will never be forgotten and remain with me and a part of me always. Not surprisingly, the commitment of the Cahns to a comprehensive clinical law school education has been fully vindicated. One only needs to survey many of the top law schools in this country to see Antioch’s legacy as most of them have some required clinical components. I donate to UDC Law because I believe it is the best hope of continuing Antioch’s cutting edge of legal education and training for aspiring lawyers. Academic attainment, with no corresponding social commitment is a luxury our society cannot afford. I want to see the Antioch tradition continued." — Penfield Tate, ‘81

"I donate to the school because I believe in its mission and goals. If it were not for Antioch, I would not be a lawyer, judge or law professor." — Penny L. Willrich, ‘82

"I give to UDC because of my admiration and faith in those who carried on after I had really written off the law school when it was no longer "Antioch", and went from being a private to a public institution. At the time, it seemed like a falsity, a termination, a "cutting off", not really the new beginning that it became. So, like a plant which benefits from a severe pruning, UDC has gone on to be bigger and better. And I am again proud to be a graduate.

"Sadly for me, being a female of no financial means, no driver’s license, nada but a metro card, I couldn’t take night classes for fears of my physical safety getting home to my then rough neighborhood at Rhode Island and P to 16th and the first night my classmate and I moved into our apartment, there was a shooting below our window - and the school represented the defendant. Hah! Instead of a street known for prostitution and seedy stores, P Street now has a Whole Foods. I later managed to sublet in Cleveland Park, from which, ironically, I could have walked to the "new Antioch" at night, even then.

"It makes me very happy that Antioch/UDC is so successful at carrying on its mission, been accessible to everyone on so many levels, and has turned out to be a beacon brighter than it was when I applied. Dean Broderick was a star student a year above me, and though I could not have imagined her future, I am not surprised at her leadership and ability to accomplish great things. (He didn’t influence me to say this, but Joe Libertelli has always been a sincerely great guy.)" — Janet Aspen, ‘83

"I give and will continue to give to UDC Law because I am proud to be an Antioch Law School graduate. It set the stage for my career of public service. I am proud of the principles upon which it was founded and which remain central to UDC Law’s mission: service to the underserved and under-represented. I am proud that the student body reflected and continues to reflect the diversity and plurality of our great city and country, with respect to ethnicity, gender, and orientation(s). Antioch broke barriers and set the standard for a 21st Century clinical/legal education. UDC Law continues to raise the bar." — Sandra Mattavous Frye, ‘83

"I donate for the reasons already given, but also because consistent and strong alumni giving is important to maintain ABA accreditation and to leverage additional financial support. As a result, the school is on a stronger foundation to enhance growth." — Doreen Hope, ‘84

"Bottom line: I think it’s because I trust you, the school and the mission/work you do. Combined with belief that you really need the money and have good use for even a modest contribution. Compare to a college with a billion in endowments. Sure they can spend more. But, why throw more money except to validate your presence on a mailing list that sends out expensive brochures? If it was water instead of cash? Why give a glass of water to somebody with a pool? Especially when you know somebody who's thirsty." — Richard Preston, ‘84

"Although I have donated as much as I could or would have liked, I donate because I am truly appreciative of the blessing and opportunity I received at Antioch. BTW I wish I lived closer. I would attend more events." — Gilbert West, ‘84

"UDC Clarke School of Law has carried on the tradition of excellence embodied in Antioch School of Law's clinical programs. The administration's, faculty's and students' dedication and commitment to the clinic programs are unsurpassed.... and the great humanitarian core values at the heart of the institution trickle down and have a positive impact on all involved. I believe most touched by the clinical programs continue to reach out to others and "Pay it Forward". What a great legacy for the alumni to support!" — Anonymous Donor, ‘85

"Antioch was (and UDC Law is) a unique law school. Its goals were and are to train lawyers to represent the poor and the vulnerable. The clinical program has provided free legal services to low income people in Washington, DC on a scale unmatched by clinical programs at other schools. That uniqueness, that fragile purpose, speaks to the better angels or our nature, deserves our support." — Paul Peloquin, ‘85

"I graduated from the former Antioch School of Law and hope that UDC David A. Clarke School of Law can carry on the same principles and philosophy about social justice and equality. I like to see the new generation of law students having the same opportunity as I did and to be exposed to such great education and principles." — Manuel Rivera, ‘85

"I donate because of the work that the students do in the clinics. I attended Antioch because of my passion for social and economic justice. I find that many lawyers divide into two categories -- some that love the law and others that are advocates. I fall in the latter category and believe that the law is a means of equaling the playing field so to speak. The clients served by UDC Law benefit from having dedicated and passionate advocates. The other reason is that I have a connection with all of you. You, Shelley, and others walked with me in the halls of Antioch and you continue to serve in the most fundamental way -- bringing new advocates to continue the legacy. Every time you send a message, I am reminded of my purpose and reasons why I took the Antioch journey. Keep writing and I'll keep giving. Thank you for all you do." — Karen Newton, ‘86

"It's nice to give back." "Why fight it?" "In life, we give." — Pete Friday, ‘87

"I have been giving serious thought about this since you first requested thoughts on this issue. I have read all the wonderful words my alum have expressed and in so many ways they have expressed my sentiments; but I will add my modest feelings none-the-less.

"I will never be a six figure lawyer, I have chosen to be a public defender of my own volition and have enjoyed almost three decades in the profession--in great part because of Antioch. Despite my less than stellar salary, I now make more money than I ever thought possible. So, I choose to give back to the institution that gave me so much.

"Antioch believed in me, and I continue to believe in them, in their mission, in their continued efforts to produce more advocates for those without a voice. More people who will Question Authority!

"Keep those e-mails coming Joe!" — Ana Maria Guzman '87

"Why give? Although I did not apply for a scholarship at my alma mater, I was the recipient of scholastic achievement scholarships, which helped me immensely through my undergraduate studies. When I applied for financial aid, I was also directed to other scholarships that were available. I learned early that scholarships and nonprofits operate on charitable giving, and that the giving is from those fortunate enough to give.

"Early on in my practice, I participated in a couple of nationwide class action cases that provided me the opportunity to make generous contributions to several undergraduate schools as part of the settlement. (This was in lieu of providing minimal funds to several thousand potential class members.) These settlement funds were set up as foundation monies for scholarships for women and minority students attending the designated schools. The corpus of these funds exist today.

"I also have been fortunate to have been directly involved as a member of the board of directors in several nonprofit organizations that affect the lives of so many people in our community (including Chair of a Foundation that awards multimillion dollar scholarships to students), all of which function through the generosity of others.

"I’ve been fortunate in what I do, and I trace it back to the first scholarship I got. The common thread that weaves the fabric of success is education. And I give to continue that success, and to make a difference in the lives of others. However small.

"I’ve also said that the best source of charitable giving for a school (as in my alma mater) is its alumni. I feel the same way for the law school. I’m hoping that donations to the law school increase over time so that it can excel in everything it does." — Anonymous Antioch Law Alum

"I donate because: 1) you ask me, 2) this school needs the money more than the other two I graduated from, 3) I want to support law students who have an interest in working for the public interest, and 4) you thank me when I give, and usually quickly and personally." — Rudi Schreiber, ‘95

"I give to the law school, because I love the law school and all that it stands for. It changed my life and put me on a career path that I never would have been on had it not been for the law school. Giving back is the least I can do, and the least I'll always do." — Anthony Cade, ‘97

"I gave because I saw only a handful of my classmates giving, and I didn't want to be counted as a chump for the class of '97 :-). I also gave because I really do appreciate my legal education obtained from DCSL, and I think the professors and staff are simply the best!" — Felicia Couts, Esq. (formerly Tucker) '97

"I learned so much at UDC-DCSL from my peers and the faculty, creating lifelong friendships which time and space will never diminish. By graduation, I was prepared for the bar exam and, as a result of two legal clinics and a summer scholarship/internship, I was also ready for the real world of practicing in a law firm. I donate out of appreciation and I hope that the law school is always able to provide other students with the opportunities afforded to me and continue in its unique mission." — Sarah C. Bullard, ‘03

"Without a doubt, "Because you love my emails and/or because you are incredibly wealthy and feel guilty hoarding all that cash? ; )" Seriously, though, I really love my school. Can’t predict the future, but I can say what has made me the trial attorney, and counselor, that I am today. I work with a variety of attorneys, and even hire them on occasion. I have been privileged to serve in Maryland, Virginia, and DC courts, both at the state and federal level. I believe there are many great law schools, and I consider UDC among them. However, it is not the quality of the teaching alone that makes the school stand out in my mind. It the passion and compassion the institution instills in its students -- to do good works and help the people around them. This does not mean we need to starve, it means services priced in a way that the community can afford, and a willingness to help others when they have no money at all. If I were to sum up UDC law in a phrase: "be heard, be seen, be active" – and in our case, active means use your law degree to support and make the community a better place." — Sean Hanover, ‘08

"'Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, these ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.'" - RFK The donated money is for hope. The school is the righteous vector." — Mike Bowers, ‘10

"I donate because UDC gave the opportunity to go to law school and stay in law school by giving me scholarships. I want to pay it forward to someone else. I also donate because I want to keep a good relationship with UDC, and I hope you send good people my way when it's time to hire my summer interns." — Jose Campos, ‘12

"UDC Law truly opened my eyes and connected my heart to the underprivileged communities that lack the opportunity to receive quality legal representation, which strengthened my inner desire to make a positive contribution to society. By supporting UDC Law, I hope to see its continued growth in society by aiding those in need, without boundaries or limitations." — Aimellia Siemson, ‘12

"Because UDC accepted me for my mission statement and not just my raw LSAT and GPA numbers and because I couldn’t be where I am today if not for UDC and because UDC’s post-graduation newsletters/e-blasts have proven useful time and time again." — Byron White, ‘13

And… In the Humor Department

"Because you love my emails!" — Carl Hartmann, ‘80

"I donate because of Joe L!!!" — Roy Kozupsky, ‘85

 

Please click here to donate.

 

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