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Dean Shelley Broderick Helps Draft New DC Constitution, Calls For Full Statehood

Tuesday, May 17, 2016   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Jordan Uhl
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DC Mayor Muriel Bowser, UDC-DCSL Dean Shelley Broderick, and Ward 3 D.C. Councilmember Mary Cheh pose with the first draft of the New Columbia Constitution that Dean Broderick helped write.

Contact:
Jordan Uhl
E: jordan.uhl@udc.edu; P: 202-274-5257 

Washington, DCAs the District of Columbia pushes for full statehood, the leadership of the District's only public law school is playing an integral role.

Shelley Broderick, Dean of the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, worked on the New Columbia Statehood Commission's legal scholars committee to help draft the new constitution which calls for full statehood for DC.

"As a card-carrying member of the Statehood party since 1980, I am honored to join the excellent legal team in crafting the constitution for the 51st state, New Columbia," Dean Broderick said.

Paul Strauss, the Shadow Senator for the District of Columbia, lauded Dean Broderick's contributions. 

"Having Dean Broderick on the legal scholars committee is a real asset. Not only is she a gifted constitutional law scholar, but her long history as a DC Statehood activist and leader in our movement give her real credibility on the issue".  

This comes in the midst of DC Mayor Muriel Bowser's pledge to make DC the 51st state.

"I am so proud of Mayor Bowser and her team for taking on the issue of statehood at a time when a dysfunctional Congress still manages to find time to interfere with the District of Columbia's right to manage its own affairs and spend its own tax dollars," Dean Broderick added.

Sen. Strauss stressed how DC's evolution since its inception and "home rule" forces an examination of DC's status.

"For DC Statehood to be taken seriously, we need a practical constitution that reflects the reality of our current governance structure today," Sen. Strauss said. "When the old Constitution was drafted we didn't have an elected Attorney General, and many of our institutions were just a few years old. We need a modern document that focuses on the most significant reform we can make, getting rid of the 535 superfluous 'wanna-be DC legislators', in the House and Senate who should not be involved in our local affairs."


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