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Dean Broderick's Open Letter On Veteran's Day

Tuesday, November 10, 2015   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Jordan Uhl
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Contact:
Jordan Uhl
E: jordan.uhl@udc.edu; P: 202-274-5257

Washington, DC –Dear members of the School of Law Community:

We are honored to have as members of our community men and women who chose to serve their nation in the military.  Tomorrow is Veterans Day and we thank them for their service,  I will be remembering especially my much loved older brother, Peter, who was a 100% disabled Vietnam War Veteran.  I miss him everyday.

The holiday was initially set-aside to celebrate the end of World War I.  It was created by a resolution of Congress with the goal that a “recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations.”   Armistice Day, as it was then called, was a celebration of peace against the brutal backdrop of destruction that was World War I. 

World War I, failed to meet its promise to be the “War that Ends All Wars.”  Hundreds of thousands of women and men went off to fight and far too often to die in World War II, Korea, and other conflicts.  In 1954, Armistice Day was changed to recognize the sacrifice of those who served and it became Veterans Day.

That Veterans Day finds its origin in a holiday set aside with the earnest hope that in the face of the horror of World War I the community of nations may find peaceful solutions to conflict, is meaningful and appropriate.  Peace, after all, is the greatest honor we can give to those who currently serve or have served.  As President Eisenhower noted in his proclamation on October 12, 1954, the first time the day was designated Veterans Day: "let us reconsecrate ourselves to the cause of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts may not have been in vain."

As a diverse community, there are many views on the decisions of our leaders that have led to military conflict and war.  But those differences do not diminish our gratitude to our family, friends and colleagues and our commitment to honor their sacrifice by “reconsecrat[ing] ourselves to the cause of … peace.”

Shelley Broderick
Dean, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law

 

 


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