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Washington, Race and Public Higher Education
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“Washington, Race and Public Higher Education,” a two-day conference at the University of the District of Columbia on December 9 and 10, provides an occasion to celebrate the 160th anniversary of the University and the publication of Since 1851: 160 Years of Scholarship and Achievement in the Nation’s Capital.

12/9/2011 to 12/10/2011
When: Friday & Saturday, Dec. 9 & 10
9 am
Where: Building 41, Room A03
4200 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, District of Columbia  20008
United States
Contact: Jean Catching


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Washington, Race and Public Higher Education

"Washington, Race and Public Higher Education,” a two-day conference at the University of the District of Columbia on December 9 and 10, provides an occasion to celebrate the 160th anniversary of the University and the publication of Since 1851: 160 Years of Scholarship and Achievement in the Nation's Capital.

The anniversary book, commissioned by the University, written by two historians, Drs. Marjorie Lightman and William Zeisel, and published by the University of the District of Columbia Press uses photographs and text to trace the history of the University through its predecessor colleges and their relations with the District, Congress and national events. The conference draws together scholars from within and outside the University, public policy specialists, and interested members of the community to examine some of the themes developed in the book.

 

Conference Schedule

 

FRIDAY (December 9th)

 

Continental Breakfast (9am)

 

Panel 1, Opening Session (10am): "The Possibilities and Limits of the University over the Coming Decades”

Moderator: Dr. Allen Sessoms, President, University of the District of Columbia

Presenters:

Dr. Clara Lovett, President emerita, Northern Arizona State University

Dr. Steven Diner, Chancellor, Rutgers University-Newark, New Jersey

Dr. William Hynes, President, Holy Name University, Oakland, California

Description:The three college presidents will present papers exploring the character and issues that define a modern, multifaceted university. Speaking from experience garnered at their own institutions and positions of leadership in higher education, they will provide a national perspective for understanding an urban university, its mission, commitment to service and intellectual discourse, as well as its social conscience. The panel will look to the future to suggest what a university can and cannot offer the community which it serves.

Open discussion will follow the papers.

 

Lunch will be served to conference participants.

 

Panel 2: Access Secured: Programs that Succeed (1:30 pm)

Moderator: Dr. Susan Harkness, Assistant Dean, University of the District of Columbia

Presenters:

Susan Scanlan, President, the Women's Research and Education Institute

Shelley Broderick, Dean, David A. Clarke School of Law,

University of the District of Columbia

Dr. Carolyn Cousin, Professor, Department of Biology,

University of the District of Columbia

Description:The participants have directed three different kinds of programs–internships in the NGO sector and Congress, a clinic-based law school, and undergraduate/graduate education in biology and chemistry. Each of the programs hasachieved success in nontraditional pedagogy, outreach, and inclusivity for women and minorities. Thepanel will explore the characteristics that have underpinned success. It will particularly focus on the development of a supportive and individualized relationship between faculty/mentors and student/participants,and the access that the programs have provided for students/participants at a critical point in their professional development. Turning to the future, the panel will address whether these programs can be significantly expanded and remain as successful, as well as theinstitutional/organizational costs for similar programs in terms of commitment on the part of the institution/organization, individual mentors andstudents/participants.

Open discussion will follow the papers.

 

BREAK

 

Panel 3: Elements of the University: Change and Continuity(3:30-5 pm)

Moderator: Dr. Christi Ford, University of the District of Columbia

Presenters:

Christopher Anglim, Archivist, University of the District of Columbia

Dr. Monica Jacobe, Writing Program, Princeton University

Dr. Herbert Weiss, Senior Fellow, Wilson Center, Washington, DC

Description: The modern, multifaceted urban university has evolved over time. Central to the evolution has been the interplay between financial support from the government and faculty. In this panel Anglimwill focus on land-grant legislation, status and the university, which is the oldest direct federal government support for higher education. Jacobewill explore the complex issues of tenured and contract faculty from the perspective of the university and members of the faculty. She will reflect on possible latent consequences as the older community-of-scholars model of the university has been transformed into anew administrativelydriven institution. Weiss will examine the centers for area studies, especially African studies, in the Cold War period and beyond. He will trace the community of government and scholarly interests that supported and debated with one another over decades as government, public policy and scholarship became increasingly intertwined in the late 20th century.

Open discussion will follow the papers.

 

SATURDAY (December 10th)

 

Continental Breakfast (8:30 am)

 

Panel 4: Washington: A Shifting Landscape (9:30-11:00 am)

Moderator: Anthony Gittens, Professor emeritus, University of the District of Columbia

Presenters:

Dr. William Zeisel, co-author of Since 1851; Partner, QED Associates LLC

Dr. Andrew Lightman, author and Managing Editor,HillRag

Amanda Huron, City Planner, City University of New York

Description:The panel will focus on change on the District, especially after the 1960s. Using the material from Since 1851…, Zeiselwill set the historical background for the panel with key moments that highlight District politics, Congress and national affairs in the story of higher education before and after the formation of the University in 1974.Lightman and Huron will provide a political and economic focus for the same decades of the late 20th century. Lightmanwill examine local political satire that fed the popular imagination of the largest US city run by African Americans in the 1970s and 80s. He will compare it with more recent political satire that reflects the city's changing economics and demography. Huron will look at gentrification, especially in the cooperative and condominium movement which began in the 70s, and which contributed to social changes that have transformed areas of the city like Capitol Hill.

 

BREAK

 

Panel 5: Black and White: Race Then and Now (11:30 am-12:45 pm)

Moderator: Dr. Marjorie Lightman, co-author Since 1851…

Presenters:

Dr. G. Derek Musgrove, Professor, University of the District of Columbia

Meredith Rode, Professor, University of the District of Columbia

Dr. Kimala Price, Professor, San Diego State University, San Diego, California

Description:Race has played a prominent role in Washington public higher education. The choices considered and made have been shaped by black/white politics since before the Civil War. Almost never observed and commented upon, however, is that from 1851 until 1968 public higher education in Washington also had an almost completely female student body. This panel will focus on the period of the late 1960s through 80s when black studies and women's studies were fostering fundamental changes in the traditional disciplinary canons of the arts and sciences. Musgrove will explore the politics and passions that surrounded the demand for black studies at Federal City College in 1969. Rode will reflect on the experience of being young, white, southern and female in her first "real” faculty position during the same tumultuous period. Price will focus to the intersections between black studies and women's studies that developed in 70s and 80s. She will explore the importance of these intersections for effective education, especially of minority women who increasingly dominate the student bodies of public universities, including the University of the District of Columbia.

Open discussion will follow the papers.

 

LUNCH (12:45-2 pm) Concluding Discussion and Remarks

 

All panels will be held in the Learning Resources Division (Building 41), Room A03.

Space is limited. Please RSVP: JCatching@UDC.EDU

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